BETA

DI friends at first are DI friends at last

Two old men, both 91 years of age, were at one time just two young boys. They went to the same grade school, the same junior high school, the same high school and graduated together.

Paul H. Heath and Elder Glen L. Rudd, emeritus member of the Seventy, both in their 90s, stand in front of buildings on Pierpont Avenue in Salt Lake City where they worked in the Church's first storehouse in 1932.
Paul H. Heath and Elder Glen L. Rudd, emeritus member of the Seventy, both in their 90s, stand in front of buildings on Pierpont Avenue in Salt Lake City where they worked in the Church's first storehouse in 1932. Photo: Keith Johnson, Deseret News

Both have always been active in the Church. These young men were deacons, teachers and priests together. They were active as Boy Scouts and were active in its leadership. They grew up, married and raised families. Both served as bishops. Both moved from the original ward to the same stake and became members of the stake high council at the same time.

Elder Glen L. Rudd
Elder Glen L. Rudd
Paul H. Heath
Paul H. Heath

Paul Heath, who was two months older, became a counselor to a bishop, then the bishop. He was released and was called back as a counselor to another bishop. The younger man, Glen Rudd, was a bishop for a long time, but served in that position just once.

Both have been vocal advocates of Boy Scouting. Paul, however, stayed with the organization and is today the chairman of the Scouting committee responsible for the Silver Beaver Awards, an important assignment.

Paul served for two years as an ordinance worker and sealer in the Hamilton New Zealand Temple; Glen was president of the temple. These two men still serve as sealers in the Salt Lake Temple.

An interesting aspect of the service rendered by these two friends is that in the early 1930s they worked in the original Pioneer Stake storehouse on Pierpont Avenue, which started in 1932.

Paul worked part-time around the storehouse, while Glen helped deliver chickens from his father's business. They also worked on the original stake farm for the Pioneer Stake.

Paul's father, Fred J. Heath, was the work director at the beginning of the welfare program. He helped build the original storehouse and was the first employment director, supervising the work for the building of the large grain elevator in 1940. Paul helped build that grain elevator. Glen was on his mission at that time and missed that opportunity. But years later, he became the manager of Welfare Square for many years.

These two old men were together through many of the greatest endeavors of their lives. Paul H. Heath and Glen L. Rudd, now turning 92, one in February and the other in May, are probably the two oldest surviving workers of the original Pioneer Stake storehouse.

Sorry, no more articles available